Cat Health Update:

How to turn your FIV diagnosis into a great cat life

What is FIV?

(Feline immunodefciency virus)


But with a little extra attention, cats with FIV can still live a fantastic life … without sacrificing any of their nine lives.

FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus) sounds terrible. Can their humans catch it? What about kids in the house? What’s this mean for other pets? Those are all valid questions. But with a little extra attention, cats with FIV can still live a fantastic life … without sacrificing any of their nine lives. Here’s how.

 

A quick overview

FIV is a slow-acting disease that affects white blood cells, which are the cells defending our bodies against infection. This means that cats with FIV are more likely to catch other diseases, which can complicate things. But if you take good care of them, they can have a life that’s just as good as any other cat.

What are the signs of FIV?

Tell-tale signs of FIV include frequent eye inflammations, a runny nose or diarrhea.

But these could be symptoms of lots of other things – the only way to be sure is with a blood test (TrustedPals' wellness plan can cover the cost of this). If you spot potential signs of FIV, give your cat a lift to the vet.

Can a cat with FIV infect their human?

No. There’s no danger of humans catching FIV. But other cats could catch it if they’re bitten or scratched by an FIV+ cat. Sensible cats know to stay indoors to avoid spreading the disease, and you can help by shutting doors and windows they might be able to slip through.

What if there’s another cat at home?

It’s not ideal. And we realize you won’t want to give either of them up. But you’ll need to put the work in to feed both with separate bowls, and regularly disinfect surfaces and litter trays. The chance of infection is low (so long as you don’t get in a fight) but that’s no excuse to take risks.

Your cats also need enough space to get away from each other, to reduce stress and prevent scraps. And if you’re looking to adopt, you might think about picking a cat who already has FIV, to minimize the risk of spreading the disease further.

Life indoors isn’t so bad

No rain. Plenty of sunbeams. And all the human attention a cat could ask for.

Put out new toys, and spend time with your cat every day. But it’s a balancing act. Cats with FIV also need to have time alone, so you should set up lots of hiding places for when they need a bit of peace and quiet. Your cat can’t escape outdoors like they used to.

You'd also be wise to buy a scratching post or two for your cat to wear themselves out with. If you don’t? The couch is fair game. It’s your choice.

Get coverage for the unexpected

Whether your cat's a serial shredder or laser-chasing champion, find a cat health insurance plan that's as unique as your furry friend. Browse the best cat insurance offering in the biz with coverage that takes 5 minutes or less to set up.

 

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FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus) sounds terrible. Can their humans catch it? What about kids in the house? What’s this mean for other pets? Those are all valid questions. But with a little extra attention, cats with FIV can still live a fantastic life … without sacrificing any of their nine lives. Here’s how.


But with a little extra attention, cats with FIV can still live a fantastic life … without sacrificing any of their nine lives.

 

A quick overview

FIV is a slow-acting disease that affects white blood cells, which are the cells defending our bodies against infection. This means that cats with FIV are more likely to catch other diseases, which can complicate things. But if you take good care of them, they can have a life that’s just as good as any other cat.

What are the signs of FIV?

Tell-tale signs of FIV include frequent eye inflammations, a runny nose or diarrhea.

But these could be symptoms of lots of other things – the only way to be sure is with a blood test (TrustedPals' wellness plan can cover the cost of this). If you spot potential signs of FIV, give your cat a lift to the vet.

Can a cat with FIV infect their human?

No. There’s no danger of humans catching FIV. But other cats could catch it if they’re bitten or scratched by an FIV+ cat. Sensible cats know to stay indoors to avoid spreading the disease, and you can help by shutting doors and windows they might be able to slip through.

What if there’s another cat at home?

It’s not ideal. And we realize you won’t want to give either of them up. But you’ll need to put the work in to feed both with separate bowls, and regularly disinfect surfaces and litter trays. The chance of infection is low (so long as you don’t get in a fight) but that’s no excuse to take risks.

Your cats also need enough space to get away from each other, to reduce stress and prevent scraps. And if you’re looking to adopt, you might think about picking a cat who already has FIV, to minimize the risk of spreading the disease further.

Life indoors isn’t so bad

No rain. Plenty of sunbeams. And all the human attention a cat could ask for.

Put out new toys, and spend time with your cat every day. But it’s a balancing act. Cats with FIV also need to have time alone, so you should set up lots of hiding places for when they need a bit of peace and quiet. Your cat can’t escape outdoors like they used to.

You'd also be wise to buy a scratching post or two for your cat to wear themselves out with. If you don’t? The couch is fair game. It’s your choice.

Get coverage for the unexpected

Whether your cat's a serial shredder or laser-chasing champion, find a cat health insurance plan that's as unique as your furry friend. Browse the best cat insurance offering in the biz with coverage that takes 5 minutes or less to set up.

 

Share this

You might be interested in

How to deal with feline dental disease

How to deal with feline dental disease

Dental disease is one of the most common medical conditions seen in cats. More than half of all cats over the age of three have some form of dental disease.

Best dog insurance and cat insurance plan

New kitten? Here’s how to give them the best start

Your new kitten's on the way, so it's time to get organized with everything you'll need (including cat insurance) to give them a great first day. 

Best cat insurance plan

How to deal with cat skin allergies

Is your cat having issues with its skin? It could be an allergic reaction, so get to the vet. Don't worry, your cat insurance will cover the medicine.