Everything you need to know

about leash training

Everything you need to know

about leash training


When you’re leash training a young pup, the most important thing to keep in mind is patience.

Puppy training tips from pet insurance that cares

 

New puppy? If they’re anything like us, he or she will need plenty of exercise, and it’s your job to make sure they get it, which can be a great way to bond while you both stay !t and healthy.

But exercising with your pup isn’t all fun and games. You’ll need to make sure you spend plenty of time making sure they know how to walk, run and play in a way that’s safe. If you don’t, you might !nd that you get pulled around by an overenthusiastic sprint, or get stuck when your pet decides they just don’t want to move.

 

Don’t leave leash training too late

Leash training is just as important a part of getting a new pet as looking for the best pet insurance and making sure the house is well-stocked with snacks and treats.
As you’d probably guess, it’s a lot easier to train dogs when they’re young. There’s a reason they say old dogs can’t learn new tricks! That doesn’t mean it’s impossible to leash train an older dog though. With the right pet insurance program, those hard to train moments, like behavioral training could be covered (But more on that in a minute.)
 

Prepping for leash training

First things first – you can’t start leash training without a leash and collar. The most important thing to keep in mind is a comfortable !t.
We don’t want anything that’s too tight and hurts us, but if you pick a leash that’s too big, we might get excited and slip out of it.
As for the leash itself, it makes sense to use a thinner one for smaller dogs and a thicker one for bigger, stronger dogs. Four to six feet is the most common length for a leash, because it gives your pet room to explore without wandering too far. But you might want to think about a shorter leash for busier areas. 
 

Let’s get comfortable with the leash

Got your leash? Perfect! You’re ready to get started. When you’re leash training a young pup, the most important thing to keep in mind is patience. If your puppy won’t walk on a leash, remember that the process can be a bit strange for us. We might need a bit of time to get used to the idea that the leash is our friend.
Start by getting your dog familiar with their collar around the house – especially during breakfast, lunch, or dinner if you want to speed things up. That will create an association between the leash and food. And nothing’s better than food. Although you can achieve the same effect by putting on your dog’s collar while they’re having fun playing around the house.
 

How to train a dog to walk on a leash beside you

Once your puppy’s comfortable with their collar and leash, it’s still a good idea to give them plenty of positive reinforcement when you’re out walking – particularly when it comes to the golden rule of not pulling on the leash.
A treat for good behavior (like walking beside you with slack in the leash) goes a long way. And so does stopping immediately if they get too excited and try to bound away. If you don’t stop, your dog will think they’re in charge and won’t learn to follow your lead.
If everything goes to plan, after a while, your dog will come to realize that the leash is there to help them and keep them safe.
But don’t stress if it takes a while. Just like humans, some of us are more stubborn than others, and there are a few di"erent ways that you can help dogs get used to walks.

 

How to leash train a dog that won’t walk

If you’ve got a stubborn pup (or an older, untrained dog) that just can’t get to grips with their leash, you may want to mix up your training a little bit. And as always, remember to be patient. The whole point of leash training is to help your pet realize that their leash means fun times out and about with you.
But if they do need a bit of extra help, here are five top tips to keep in mind:
    1) If your dog keeps pulling on their leash to chase after bugs or birds, it might be easier to walk them in the middle of the day, when there are fewer around.
    2) Got a puppy that’s a bundle of energy? Playing with them at home before you go out for a walk is a great way to tire them out a bit and stop any overexcitement.
    3) If your dog is too strong for you, you might want to use a full harness instead of a leash – especially if they’re fully grown rather than young pups.
    4) You might find that sometimes your dog sits down and just won’t move. Don’t get frustrated. Just make sure you’ve got a treat close at hand and walk a little way away. They’ll be back on their feet in a flash.
    5) Avoid unfamiliar areas if they excite your dog. Stick to an area they know well at first, to get rid of any distractions.

 

The best pets deserve the best pet insurance

Before you get your puppy (or stubborn adult dog) out and about for some leash training, make sure you’ve got a pet insurance plan in place to protect them. You never know if they might get overexcited and end up scraping themselves if they’re not used to being out and about.
Going to the right pet insurance program makes managing any little bumps or bruises easy. With a TrustedPals pet insurance plan, you can take your dog to any licensed vet, and you don’t need to provide medical records or have an exam to sign up, so the whole thing is stress-free for you, and your new best friend.
Keen to learn more? Just get in touch!
 

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Puppy training tips from pet insurance that cares

 

New puppy? If they’re anything like us, he or she will need plenty of exercise, and it’s your job to make sure they get it, which can be a great way to bond while you both stay !t and healthy.

But exercising with your pup isn’t all fun and games. You’ll need to make sure you spend plenty of time making sure they know how to walk, run and play in a way that’s safe. If you don’t, you might !nd that you get pulled around by an overenthusiastic sprint, or get stuck when your pet decides they just don’t want to move.


When you’re leash training a young pup, the most important thing to keep in mind is patience.

 

Don’t leave leash training too late

Leash training is just as important a part of getting a new pet as looking for the best pet insurance and making sure the house is well-stocked with snacks and treats.
As you’d probably guess, it’s a lot easier to train dogs when they’re young. There’s a reason they say old dogs can’t learn new tricks! That doesn’t mean it’s impossible to leash train an older dog though. With the right pet insurance program, those hard to train moments, like behavioral training could be covered (But more on that in a minute.)
 

Prepping for leash training

First things first – you can’t start leash training without a leash and collar. The most important thing to keep in mind is a comfortable !t.
We don’t want anything that’s too tight and hurts us, but if you pick a leash that’s too big, we might get excited and slip out of it.
As for the leash itself, it makes sense to use a thinner one for smaller dogs and a thicker one for bigger, stronger dogs. Four to six feet is the most common length for a leash, because it gives your pet room to explore without wandering too far. But you might want to think about a shorter leash for busier areas. 
 

Let’s get comfortable with the leash

Got your leash? Perfect! You’re ready to get started. When you’re leash training a young pup, the most important thing to keep in mind is patience. If your puppy won’t walk on a leash, remember that the process can be a bit strange for us. We might need a bit of time to get used to the idea that the leash is our friend.
Start by getting your dog familiar with their collar around the house – especially during breakfast, lunch, or dinner if you want to speed things up. That will create an association between the leash and food. And nothing’s better than food. Although you can achieve the same effect by putting on your dog’s collar while they’re having fun playing around the house.
 

How to train a dog to walk on a leash beside you

Once your puppy’s comfortable with their collar and leash, it’s still a good idea to give them plenty of positive reinforcement when you’re out walking – particularly when it comes to the golden rule of not pulling on the leash.
A treat for good behavior (like walking beside you with slack in the leash) goes a long way. And so does stopping immediately if they get too excited and try to bound away. If you don’t stop, your dog will think they’re in charge and won’t learn to follow your lead.
If everything goes to plan, after a while, your dog will come to realize that the leash is there to help them and keep them safe.
But don’t stress if it takes a while. Just like humans, some of us are more stubborn than others, and there are a few di"erent ways that you can help dogs get used to walks.

 

How to leash train a dog that won’t walk

If you’ve got a stubborn pup (or an older, untrained dog) that just can’t get to grips with their leash, you may want to mix up your training a little bit. And as always, remember to be patient. The whole point of leash training is to help your pet realize that their leash means fun times out and about with you.
But if they do need a bit of extra help, here are five top tips to keep in mind:
    1) If your dog keeps pulling on their leash to chase after bugs or birds, it might be easier to walk them in the middle of the day, when there are fewer around.
    2) Got a puppy that’s a bundle of energy? Playing with them at home before you go out for a walk is a great way to tire them out a bit and stop any overexcitement.
    3) If your dog is too strong for you, you might want to use a full harness instead of a leash – especially if they’re fully grown rather than young pups.
    4) You might find that sometimes your dog sits down and just won’t move. Don’t get frustrated. Just make sure you’ve got a treat close at hand and walk a little way away. They’ll be back on their feet in a flash.
    5) Avoid unfamiliar areas if they excite your dog. Stick to an area they know well at first, to get rid of any distractions.

 

The best pets deserve the best pet insurance

Before you get your puppy (or stubborn adult dog) out and about for some leash training, make sure you’ve got a pet insurance plan in place to protect them. You never know if they might get overexcited and end up scraping themselves if they’re not used to being out and about.
Going to the right pet insurance program makes managing any little bumps or bruises easy. With a TrustedPals pet insurance plan, you can take your dog to any licensed vet, and you don’t need to provide medical records or have an exam to sign up, so the whole thing is stress-free for you, and your new best friend.
Keen to learn more? Just get in touch!
 

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Don't let us pull you away! Start young and follow up with consistent encouragement and training for life.

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