How to deal with

feline dental disease

How to deal with

feline dental disease


Taking care of a pet is not an easy task and not everyone is ready to do it well.

Dental disease is one of the most common medical conditions seen in cats. More than half of all cats over the age of three have some form of dental disease. 

The most common problem is an inflammation of the gums caused by the accumulation of plaque – periodontal disease (a progression from gingivitis), and tooth decay (formerly called feline oral decay lesions or cervical neck lesions). To help cover the cost of dental disease in cats, there are comprehensive pet health insurance plans available.

 

Signs of Dental Disease

There are many signs of cat dental disease that cannot be detected by their owners. A full oral examination by a qualified veterinarian, with general anesthetic and intraoral radiographs (X-rays) may be required to detect hidden disease.

If your cats does show signs, it may include pawing at her mouth, head shaking, or jaw chattering. These symptoms may be an indication of an onset of dental disease and can be exacerbated by your cat who may be experiencing discomfort in chewing food, dropping food from her mouth, swallowing with difficulty, or excessive drooling or your notice their saliva containing blood.

If any of these symptoms are experienced, it is high time to call your veterinarian so any mishappening can be avoided. Halitosis (an unpleasant breath odor) is also common among cats. Dental disease and oral pain may account for the finicky appetites that some cats display.

Many cats will refuse dry food or swallow it whole (without chewing) and demonstrate a preference for moist or canned foods. Some cats will have a decreased interest in food or may hesitantly approach their food bowl and show a reluctance to eat. This may lead to noticeable weight loss.

 

Most common dental diseases in cats

The most common dental diseases in cats are periodontal disease and tooth resorption. Periodontal disease and tooth resorption is a term that is used to describe infection and the associated inflammation of the periodontal (the tissues surrounding the tooth). 

Specifically, there are four tissues that make up the periodontium. They are the gingival, the cementum (covering of the root surface), the periodontal ligament (the ligament attaching the tooth root to the bone) and the alveolar bone.

Periodontal disease starts with early inflammation of the gums (gingivitis). Gingivitis results from plaque (bacterial slime) that accumulates on the tooth surfaces and contacts the gingiva. Plaque is a biofilm and home to many thousands of bacteria.

Some of this plaque is naturally removed during eating or by the action of the cat's tongue. However, without daily brushing, plaque quickly builds and eventually (over 36-48 hours) mineralizes, forming hard tartar (also called calculus). 

Tartar has a rough surface to which plaque can “stick” more readily. Untreated, gingivitis may lead to further inflammation of the other tissues of the periodontium. Progression of periodontal disease leads to loss of the tooth support and loss of the tooth. Cat health insurance helps you to get your feline treated for dental disease early and easily.

There may be other consequences of periodontal disease due to the loss of bone including oronasal fistula (a hole from the mouth into the nose), jaw fracture, abscessation with draining tracts that develop in the mouth or on the face or under the chin.

Some studies indicate that the bacteria from severe oral disease that gets into the bloodstream may also be associated with pathological changes in major organs such as the heart, liver, and kidney.

 

Treating Cat Dental Disease

If you see that your cat has evidence of tartar accumulation, gingivitis, or is exhibiting any signs of mouth pain or discomfort, you should take her to your family veterinarian for a detailed oral examination. 

You will be advised of the most appropriate course of treatment, which may involve having your cat's teeth examined, professionally cleaned, and X-rayed under general anesthesia. It is important to obtain the best pet insurance plan to help you cover the financial costs to ensure your cat’s dental care needs are met.

 

Conclusion

Pet health insurance is an essential aspect of properly caring for your pet and ensuring their longevity. Acquiring the right insurance plan can help you keep your cat healthy without causing a significant financial burden.

 

Share this

You might be interested in

Best dog insurance and cat insurance plan

New kitten? Here’s how to give them the best start

Your new kitten's on the way, so it's time to get organized with everything you'll need (including cat insurance) to give them a great first day. 

How to deal with feline dental disease

How to deal with feline dental disease

Dental disease is one of the most common medical conditions seen in cats. More than half of all cats over the age of three have some form of dental disease.

Best cat insurance plan

How to deal with cat skin allergies

Is your cat having issues with its skin? It could be an allergic reaction, so get to the vet. Don't worry, your cat insurance will cover the medicine. 

Dental disease is one of the most common medical conditions seen in cats. More than half of all cats over the age of three have some form of dental disease. 

The most common problem is an inflammation of the gums caused by the accumulation of plaque – periodontal disease (a progression from gingivitis), and tooth decay (formerly called feline oral decay lesions or cervical neck lesions). To help cover the cost of dental disease in cats, there are comprehensive pet health insurance plans available.


Taking care of a pet is not an easy task and not everyone is ready to do it well.

 

Signs of Dental Disease

There are many signs of cat dental disease that cannot be detected by their owners. A full oral examination by a qualified veterinarian, with general anesthetic and intraoral radiographs (X-rays) may be required to detect hidden disease.

If your cats does show signs, it may include pawing at her mouth, head shaking, or jaw chattering. These symptoms may be an indication of an onset of dental disease and can be exacerbated by your cat who may be experiencing discomfort in chewing food, dropping food from her mouth, swallowing with difficulty, or excessive drooling or your notice their saliva containing blood.

If any of these symptoms are experienced, it is high time to call your veterinarian so any mishappening can be avoided. Halitosis (an unpleasant breath odor) is also common among cats. Dental disease and oral pain may account for the finicky appetites that some cats display.

Many cats will refuse dry food or swallow it whole (without chewing) and demonstrate a preference for moist or canned foods. Some cats will have a decreased interest in food or may hesitantly approach their food bowl and show a reluctance to eat. This may lead to noticeable weight loss.

 

Most common dental diseases in cats

The most common dental diseases in cats are periodontal disease and tooth resorption. Periodontal disease and tooth resorption is a term that is used to describe infection and the associated inflammation of the periodontal (the tissues surrounding the tooth). 

Specifically, there are four tissues that make up the periodontium. They are the gingival, the cementum (covering of the root surface), the periodontal ligament (the ligament attaching the tooth root to the bone) and the alveolar bone.

Periodontal disease starts with early inflammation of the gums (gingivitis). Gingivitis results from plaque (bacterial slime) that accumulates on the tooth surfaces and contacts the gingiva. Plaque is a biofilm and home to many thousands of bacteria.

Some of this plaque is naturally removed during eating or by the action of the cat's tongue. However, without daily brushing, plaque quickly builds and eventually (over 36-48 hours) mineralizes, forming hard tartar (also called calculus). 

Tartar has a rough surface to which plaque can “stick” more readily. Untreated, gingivitis may lead to further inflammation of the other tissues of the periodontium. Progression of periodontal disease leads to loss of the tooth support and loss of the tooth. Cat health insurance helps you to get your feline treated for dental disease early and easily.

There may be other consequences of periodontal disease due to the loss of bone including oronasal fistula (a hole from the mouth into the nose), jaw fracture, abscessation with draining tracts that develop in the mouth or on the face or under the chin.

Some studies indicate that the bacteria from severe oral disease that gets into the bloodstream may also be associated with pathological changes in major organs such as the heart, liver, and kidney.

 

Treating Cat Dental Disease

If you see that your cat has evidence of tartar accumulation, gingivitis, or is exhibiting any signs of mouth pain or discomfort, you should take her to your family veterinarian for a detailed oral examination. 

You will be advised of the most appropriate course of treatment, which may involve having your cat's teeth examined, professionally cleaned, and X-rayed under general anesthesia. It is important to obtain the best pet insurance plan to help you cover the financial costs to ensure your cat’s dental care needs are met.

 

Conclusion

Pet health insurance is an essential aspect of properly caring for your pet and ensuring their longevity. Acquiring the right insurance plan can help you keep your cat healthy without causing a significant financial burden.

 

Share this

You might be interested in

Best dog insurance and cat insurance plan

New kitten? Here’s how to give them the best start

Your new kitten's on the way, so it's time to get organized with everything you'll need (including cat insurance) to give them a great first day. 

How to deal with feline dental disease

How to deal with feline dental disease

Dental disease is one of the most common medical conditions seen in cats. More than half of all cats over the age of three have some form of dental disease.

Best cat insurance plan

How to deal with cat skin allergies

Is your cat having issues with its skin? It could be an allergic reaction, so get to the vet. Don't worry, your cat insurance will cover the medicine.