Pet Parent Home Safety Guide:

5 areas of your home to pet-proof today

Pet Parent Home Safety Guide:

5 areas of your home to pet-proof today


You can take a few simple steps today to head off emergency vet visits tomorrow.

We’re all extra-cautious when our pets are outside. But sometimes our furry friends get into even more trouble when we think they should be the most safe – right in our home sweet home. 

That’s why it’s so important to look at your home with an eye toward furry-friend mischief … so you can take a few simple steps today to head off emergency vet visits tomorrow. Consider pet-proofing these 5 areas of your home:

1. The Kitchen

The heart of the home poses multiple dangers to pets.  After all, everything smells so good there.  And that food on the counter is just so tempting. 

Whether you’ve got a dog who specializes in grazing from the counters or a cat who delights in strolling along the top of the cupboards, it’s a good idea to avoid leaving food sitting out (especially if you’re not there to keep an eye on everyone).

Losing the Sunday pot roast is one thing.  But foods that we humans love can make our furry friends really sick.  Here are just a few things to watch out for:

  • Chocolate
  • Coffee grounds, beans or chocolate-covered espresso beans
  • Onions
  • Chives
  • Garlic
  • Avocados
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Grapes and raisins
  • Fruits with pits like cherries, apricots or peaches 
  • Candy with the artificial sweetener xylitol
  • Alcohol

Many pet parents install a baby gate or door to help keep pets out of off-limit areas such as the stove while cooking.

Be sure to get a garbage can with a lid or place garbage cans and recycling bins in cupboards (with a child safety latch for those extra-sneaky furry friends).

Child safety latches are also important additions to cupboards with cleaning supplies, pantries, or drawers with knives or other utensils.

Will your furry friend be the next one at the vet emergency room?

1 in 3 pets need emergency
care each year

SOURCE: “Are You Prepared For A Pet Emergency? Most Americans Are Not,” CNBC, 6/14/18

 
 

 
 

2. Bathroom/Laundry Area

Temptations abound here.  As a result, one of the best recommendations is to keep these doors shut. 

(This can be especially important for pets who are easily frightened by loud noises or storms.  If they’re suddenly scared when you’re not home and hide in these areas, you’ll want to be sure to do an extra-thorough job of pet proofing.)

Its way too easy for your furry friend to get into things that could make them really sick like:

  • Laundry detergent pods
  • Fabric softeners
  • Dryer sheets
  • Bleach Cleaning supplies
  • Vitamins
  • Medications
  • Toothpaste
  • Make-up

Then there are choking hazards like dental floss, Q-tips, washcloths, toilet paper, and children’s bath toys.

Like the kitchen, child-safety locks are a good idea for all cabinets in the bathroom or laundry.  And be sure to keep the door on your washer and dryer closed at all times.


 
 

3. Living Room

Because your furry friend is unquestionably part of the family, they’re sure to spend a lot of time in this area.  But you’ll want to watch out for common items that can cause trouble:

  • Electric wires can be dangerous for pets who love to chew.
  • Cords on blinds or curtains can be choking hazards or may easily become wrapped around a curious paw (or even worse).
  • House plants may look like the perfect snack but many are poisonous to pets so be sure you know which type you have.
  • If you’ve got a fireplace, firestarter bricks or even logs can prove irresistible.  (Plus, if your furry friend loves a little rough-housing from time to time, consider adding pads to the corners of your hearth to help avoid injuries.)

TrustedPals helps pet-proof "outside time" with its TrustedSpotter program.

It's a free tag program that helps reunite furry friends with their pet parents - just in case one of them goes astray.

 
 

 
 

4. Bedroom/Closets

Many furry friends sleep in their pet parents’ bedrooms.  But clothes left on the floor, dirty laundry or that perfect pair of shoes can look pretty attractive when your furry friend is bored and you’re sound asleep.

Closed doors on closets are a key strategy for pet proofing here.

 

 
 

5. Utility Rooms/Outdoor Areas

Garages, basements and outdoor storage sheds can look like a treasure trove to a curious pet.  Be sure to secure lawn equipment so it can’t be knocked over and make sure outdoor chemicals like fertilizers or insecticides are stored in cabinets with child safety locks.

Just like house plants, landscaping can look yummy after your furry friend has worked up an appetite exploring the great outdoors.  Bedding mulch, landscaping rocks and even some plants can be fair game.

If your furry friend is a chewer, consider removing these items so you can both relax when you’re enjoying the great outdoors.

There’s no way to completely avoid all accidents around the house.  But taking a little time to look at your home from the viewpoint of a mischievous furry friend can help you head off temptations so you both have a safer home sweet home.

Of course, pet insurance can be another way to pet-proof your budget against sudden vet bills. Here are a few things to consider as you compare plans. You can also get a quote to protect your furry friend with TrustedPals.

 
 

Share this

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Expensive or not, one thing is certain – good medical care can bring your pets out of life-threatening situations. One such medical advancement is diagnostic tests like Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). MRI testing allows veterinarians to evaluate the inside of your pet’s body in a non-invasive way.

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We’re all extra-cautious when our pets are outside. But sometimes our furry friends get into even more trouble when we think they should be the most safe – right in our home sweet home. 

That’s why it’s so important to look at your home with an eye toward furry-friend mischief … so you can take a few simple steps today to head off emergency vet visits tomorrow. Consider pet-proofing these 5 areas of your home:

1. The Kitchen

The heart of the home poses multiple dangers to pets.  After all, everything smells so good there.  And that food on the counter is just so tempting. 

Whether you’ve got a dog who specializes in grazing from the counters or a cat who delights in strolling along the top of the cupboards, it’s a good idea to avoid leaving food sitting out (especially if you’re not there to keep an eye on everyone).

Losing the Sunday pot roast is one thing.  But foods that we humans love can make our furry friends really sick.  Here are just a few things to watch out for:

  • Chocolate
  • Coffee grounds, beans or chocolate-covered espresso beans
  • Onions
  • Chives
  • Garlic
  • Avocados
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Grapes and raisins
  • Fruits with pits like cherries, apricots or peaches 
  • Candy with the artificial sweetener xylitol
  • Alcohol

Many pet parents install a baby gate or door to help keep pets out of off-limit areas such as the stove while cooking.

Be sure to get a garbage can with a lid or place garbage cans and recycling bins in cupboards (with a child safety latch for those extra-sneaky furry friends).

Child safety latches are also important additions to cupboards with cleaning supplies, pantries, or drawers with knives or other utensils.

Will your furry friend be the next one at the vet emergency room?

1 in 3 pets need emergency
care each year

SOURCE: “Are You Prepared For A Pet Emergency? Most Americans Are Not,” CNBC, 6/14/18

 
 

 
 

2. Bathroom/Laundry Area

Temptations abound here.  As a result, one of the best recommendations is to keep these doors shut. 

(This can be especially important for pets who are easily frightened by loud noises or storms.  If they’re suddenly scared when you’re not home and hide in these areas, you’ll want to be sure to do an extra-thorough job of pet proofing.)

Its way too easy for your furry friend to get into things that could make them really sick like:

  • Laundry detergent pods
  • Fabric softeners
  • Dryer sheets
  • Bleach Cleaning supplies
  • Vitamins
  • Medications
  • Toothpaste
  • Make-up

Then there are choking hazards like dental floss, Q-tips, washcloths, toilet paper, and children’s bath toys.

Like the kitchen, child-safety locks are a good idea for all cabinets in the bathroom or laundry.  And be sure to keep the door on your washer and dryer closed at all times.


 
 

3. Living Room

Because your furry friend is unquestionably part of the family, they’re sure to spend a lot of time in this area.  But you’ll want to watch out for common items that can cause trouble:

  • Electric wires can be dangerous for pets who love to chew.
  • Cords on blinds or curtains can be choking hazards or may easily become wrapped around a curious paw (or even worse).
  • House plants may look like the perfect snack but many are poisonous to pets so be sure you know which type you have.
  • If you’ve got a fireplace, firestarter bricks or even logs can prove irresistible.  (Plus, if your furry friend loves a little rough-housing from time to time, consider adding pads to the corners of your hearth to help avoid injuries.)

TrustedPals helps pet-proof "outside time" with its TrustedSpotter program.

It's a free tag program that helps reunite furry friends with their pet parents - just in case one of them goes astray.

 
 

 
 

4. Bedroom/Closets

Many furry friends sleep in their pet parents’ bedrooms.  But clothes left on the floor, dirty laundry or that perfect pair of shoes can look pretty attractive when your furry friend is bored and you’re sound asleep.

Closed doors on closets are a key strategy for pet proofing here.

 

 
 

5. Utility Rooms/Outdoor Areas

Garages, basements and outdoor storage sheds can look like a treasure trove to a curious pet.  Be sure to secure lawn equipment so it can’t be knocked over and make sure outdoor chemicals like fertilizers or insecticides are stored in cabinets with child safety locks.

Just like house plants, landscaping can look yummy after your furry friend has worked up an appetite exploring the great outdoors.  Bedding mulch, landscaping rocks and even some plants can be fair game.

If your furry friend is a chewer, consider removing these items so you can both relax when you’re enjoying the great outdoors.

There’s no way to completely avoid all accidents around the house.  But taking a little time to look at your home from the viewpoint of a mischievous furry friend can help you head off temptations so you both have a safer home sweet home.

Of course, pet insurance can be another way to pet-proof your budget against sudden vet bills. Here are a few things to consider as you compare plans. You can also get a quote to protect your furry friend with TrustedPals.

 
 

You can take a few simple steps today to head off emergency vet visits tomorrow.

Share this

You might be interested in

5 Areas Of Your Home To Pet-Proof Today

Pet parent home safety guide

We’re all extra-cautious when our pets are outside.  But sometimes our furry friends get into even more trouble when we think they should be the most safe – right in our home sweet home.

Does Pet Insurance Cover MRI Scans?

Does pet insurance
cover MRI scans?

Expensive or not, one thing is certain – good medical care can bring your pets out of life-threatening situations. One such medical advancement is diagnostic tests like Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). MRI testing allows veterinarians to evaluate the inside of your pet’s body in a non-invasive way.

Signs Your Pet Has Seasonal Allergies

Signs your pet has
seasonal allergies

Humans are not the only ones who suffer from allergies. Yes, you read that right, pets get seasonal allergies too!