Why do dogs sneeze?

(Bless you)

Why do dogs sneeze?

(Bless you)


We’re at nose level with lots of flowers (and pollen) and kicked-up dust goes right up our noses.

Snorting, snoring and sneezing?

Most likely nothing to worry about. It might be dust, pollen or something else irritating your nose – just for a moment. If you’re sneezing all the time though, your human needs to look into it.

Just having fun? Or not?

We make a sound that seems like sneeze when we get excited, it’s not a problem. Often, us dogs sneeze when we meet other dogs, or when our human’s burning off (lots of) energy with us. It’s not the same as a human’s sneeze – it just shows that we’re having a good time.

On the flip side, dogs can get nasal infections, which can cause coughs and sneezes. Just like the ones humans get. Much less fun than letting off steam in the park. In serious cases, where we’ve accidentally breathed in fungal spores or nasal mites, your human might spot swelling or even nose bleeds. No good! You’ll need a trip to the vet to get sorted out – on the double.

Could it be an allergy?

Dogs can have similar allergic reactions to humans, and for the unlucky among us, it can be pretty bad. We’re at nose-level with lots of flowers (and pollen) and kicked-up dust goes right up our noses.

Your human can help out by keeping your home as clean as possible, regularly washing your bed and using a hypoallergenic shampoo when it’s time for a bath (yes, we know you’re not a fan of bath time – neither are we).

Dental problems

Probably not the first thing to cross your mind, but a dog’s sneeze can actually be caused by bad teeth.

Since your mouth and your nose are pretty close together, an infection in one can spread to the other. That’s one more reason why good dental health is really important!

Maybe it’s just your breed

Dogs with shorter faces (like pugs and British bulldogs) are more prone to the odd sneeze. There’s not much you can do about that, and so long as your human keeps a close eye on how you’re doing, you’ll be fine.

Is that a snort or a sneeze?

A snort can mean there’s something blocking your airways. Given the scrapes we get into, it could be almost anything, so again, a trip to the vet’s in order.

And (sorry to get personal) it could mean you’re just a little overweight. You should take your human out more often and ask them to stop being so generous at dinner time. You might not want to, but it’s all for the best in the long term…

 

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Snorting, snoring and sneezing?

Most likely nothing to worry about. It might be dust, pollen or something else irritating your nose – just for a moment. If you’re sneezing all the time though, your human needs to look into it.


We’re at nose level with lots of flowers (and pollen) and kicked-up dust goes right up our noses.

Just having fun? Or not?

We make a sound that seems like sneeze when we get excited, it’s not a problem. Often, us dogs sneeze when we meet other dogs, or when our human’s burning off (lots of) energy with us. It’s not the same as a human’s sneeze – it just shows that we’re having a good time.

On the flip side, dogs can get nasal infections, which can cause coughs and sneezes. Just like the ones humans get. Much less fun than letting off steam in the park. In serious cases, where we’ve accidentally breathed in fungal spores or nasal mites, your human might spot swelling or even nose bleeds. No good! You’ll need a trip to the vet to get sorted out – on the double.

Could it be an allergy?

Dogs can have similar allergic reactions to humans, and for the unlucky among us, it can be pretty bad. We’re at nose-level with lots of flowers (and pollen) and kicked-up dust goes right up our noses.

Your human can help out by keeping your home as clean as possible, regularly washing your bed and using a hypoallergenic shampoo when it’s time for a bath (yes, we know you’re not a fan of bath time – neither are we).

Dental problems

Probably not the first thing to cross your mind, but a dog’s sneeze can actually be caused by bad teeth.

Since your mouth and your nose are pretty close together, an infection in one can spread to the other. That’s one more reason why good dental health is really important!

Maybe it’s just your breed

Dogs with shorter faces (like pugs and British bulldogs) are more prone to the odd sneeze. There’s not much you can do about that, and so long as your human keeps a close eye on how you’re doing, you’ll be fine.

Is that a snort or a sneeze?

A snort can mean there’s something blocking your airways. Given the scrapes we get into, it could be almost anything, so again, a trip to the vet’s in order.

And (sorry to get personal) it could mean you’re just a little overweight. You should take your human out more often and ask them to stop being so generous at dinner time. You might not want to, but it’s all for the best in the long term…

 

Share this

You might be interested in

Dealing with dog parks

How to deal with dog parks

If it’s your first time heading out to a dog park, you might be surprised to learn they’re a bit of a contentious issue.

10 tips to keep dogs safe around fireworks

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Try these tips to keep your dog calm and safe around fireworks, and help minimize your furry friend’s anxiety.

Essentials you need when bringing home a new puppy

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